Jetlag

The synchronic adjustment between time zones is only one part of the shifting required when settling into a time zone that crosses oceans, languages and customs. Certainly, there is the internal clock of sleep and digestion that finds itself unhinged from the accustomed cycles of dark and light. But, additionally there are the habits of space and movement. How a street gets crossed. What distance is close enough, and the meaning implicate in the volume of one’s voice.

Jetlag involves more than the disruption of internal timekeeping. Toss in the smells and sounds, floral humidity or bone-dry pollution, traffic flows and assumptions about courtesy. It is more than time; there are elements in life of timing to which our internal sense of motion and flow must readjust. The different taste of seasons, how the wind feels, and the softness or acridity of the air all ask for a recalibration our internal compass to this new here and now.

It’s a short window into the differences between places. All too soon, that which is odd and off center will again spin as our new axis of normal.

One Response to Jetlag

  1. Yes, I understand your thoughts about jetlag. It’s true, “timing” and the “internal clock” don’t begin to touch the true nature of the disorientation. On the rare occasions when I’ve been able to travel away from the U.S. for an extended time, it takes me several days to get used to the familiar rhythms of “home” when I return.

Leave a reply